JAPANESE LANGUAGE

If you are looking for a translator from Japanese or Japanese Italian , we are please to offer the service of our extensive pool of Japanese linguists to match your needs.

We offer you translation into/from Japanese with quality, reliability, discretion, speed and reasonable price guaranteed:

  • Processing of professional technical documentation (no extra charge)
  • Translations of large documents, manuals, offers and tenders within short deadlines
  • Translation of common texts
  • Customisation of software and websites
  • Promotional materials, presentations, annual reports
  • Business correspondence in the mentioned languages
  • Editing and proofreading of ready texts, typing and OCR services
  • Consecutive interpreting
  • Informative interpreting
  • Translations by native speakers
  • Legal verification of documents
  • PC processing according to your requirements (Trados, Transit, Word XP, Excel, etc.)

SOME FACTS ABOUT JAPANESE LANGUAGE

Japanese, language of uncertain origin that is spoken by more than 125 million people, most of whom live in Japan. There are also many speakers of Japanese in the Ryukyu Islands, Korea, Taiwan, parts of the United States, and Brazil. Japanese appears to be unrelated to any other language; however, some scholars see a kinship with the Korean tongue because the grammars of the two are very similar. Some linguists also link both Japanese and Korean to the Altaic languages. Japanese exhibits a degree of agglutination. In an agglutinative language, different linguistic elements, each of which exists separately and has a fixed meaning, are often joined to form one word. Japanese lacks tones, but has a musical accent and usually stresses all syllables equally. There is no declension for nouns and pronouns, whose grammatical relationships are shown by particles that follow them. Verbs are inflected and generally are placed at the end of a sentence. Extensive use of honorific forms is especially characteristic of Japanese; varying constructions are used to indicate differences in the social status among the individual speaking, the individual addressed, and the individual spoken about.

In the 3d and 4th cent. A.D., the Japanese borrowed the Chinese writing system of ideographic characters. Since Chinese is not inflected and since Chinese writing is ideographic rather than phonetic, the Chinese characters do not completely fill the needs of the inflected Japanese language in the sphere of writing. In the 8th cent. A.D., two phonetic syllabaries, or kana, were therefore devised for the recording of the Japanese language. They are used along with the ideographic characters (or kanji characters) to indicate the syllables that form suffixes and particles. The direction of writing is usually from top to bottom in vertical columns and from right to left. In scientific texts horizontal writing from left to right is sometimes employed. The Roman alphabet has also been used increasingly to transcribe Japanese. Since several thousand characters and two sets of kana are necessary for reading Japanese literature and periodicals, a need for simplification was felt when universal literacy became a national goal. Thus, after World War II, many kanji characters were simplified, and the number generally used was limited to about 2,000. Through another reform, phonetic kana characters are now used to correspond more closely to modern pronunciation than previously was the case. The large number of its speakers and the high level of cultural, economic, and political development of the Japanese people make Japanese one of the leading languages of the world.

OUR SERVICES

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