NORWEGIAN LANGUAGE

If you are looking for a translator from Norwegian or into Norwegian , we are please to offer the service of our extensive pool of Norwegian linguists to match your needs.

We offer you translation into/from Norwegian with quality, reliability, discretion, speed and reasonable price guaranteed:

  • Processing of professional technical documentation (no extra charge)
  • Translations of large documents, manuals, offers and tenders within short deadlines
  • Translation of common texts
  • Customisation of software and websites
  • Promotional materials, presentations, annual reports
  • Business correspondence in the mentioned languages
  • Editing and proofreading of ready texts, typing and OCR services
  • Consecutive interpreting
  • Informative interpreting
  • Translations by native speakers
  • Legal verification of documents
  • PC processing according to your requirements (Trados, Transit, Word XP, Excel, etc.)

SOME FACTS ABOUT NORWEGIAN LANGUAGE

Norwegian language, member of the North Germanic, or Scandinavian, group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. It is spoken by about 4 million people in Norway and another million in the other Scandinavian countries and North America. Norwegian is a daughter language of Old Norse. Today there are two official forms of Norwegian: bokmal [book language] and nynorsk [new Norwegian]. Bokmal, also called riksmal [national language] and Dano-Norwegian, was greatly influenced by Danish, which was the dominant language of officialdom when Norway was under Danish rule (1397–1814). The language of the cities, the official and professional classes, and literature, bokmal came to differ greatly from the Norwegian spoken by the common people. Since 1905, however, orthographical and grammatical reforms by the government have brought bokmal closer to the popular form of Norwegian. Nynorsk, also known as landsmal [country language], stems from the native Norwegian dialects that evolved from Old Norse (uninfluenced by Danish), and it is therefore very different from bokmal. Developed by Ivar Aasen, nynorsk was introduced by him in 1853 as part of a nationalistic desire to have a purely Norwegian language for the country. It is based on rural dialects and spoken principally in rural areas. Both bokmal and nynorsk are employed by the government, the schools, and the mass media, but bokmal is by far the more widely used of the two, especially in education and literature. Some efforts have been made to fuse the two forms of Norwegian into one common Norwegian tongue called samnorsk [common Norwegian], and there is hope that this can be accomplished. Norwegian grammar is fairly simple. The form of the noun is changed only to indicate possession and the plural, and personal inflection of the verb has been discarded. Like Swedish, Norwegian uses pitch accents, but to a lesser degree. The pitch accents give the language a musical quality and are sometimes employed to distinguish the meanings of homonyms. Norwegian employs the Roman alphabet, which was introduced in Norway in the 11th cent. and to which three characters o, and a, have been added.

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